Jobs

Find job openings and jobs available now.

does any one know about micro chipping in humans?

by tom44 on March 10, 2014

200 Companies Hiring Home Workers Now – Click Here
No Experience Necessary



Question by lovekitty: does any one know about micro chipping in humans?

Best answer:

Answer by christina p.
Yes- It’s the governments way to check up on you and make sure you never leave the “land of dreams & opportunity”.

Add your own answer in the comments!

IdentityCloaker.com
Take back your privacy!

Are you currently Unemployed?
Learn insider tips to landing a Federal Job

How to Land a Top-Paying Federal Job

Learn 4 Tips To Find Entry Level Jobs – Click Here

Share Button

4 thoughts on “does any one know about micro chipping in humans?

  1. flashheart says:

    use the tin foil man

  2. hope says:

    sound good ONLY in sex offenders!! and they can put it right in ***:D

  3. ChaZ says:

    IT’s just like what they do to pets. It’s a chip that emits digital information about the person. Address, Blood type, disease history, etc. What ever you want to put on the chip really. It’s basically a “dog tag” you scan that shows information.

  4. marshmellow says:

    FDA approves computer chip for humans
    Devices could help doctors with stored medical information

    The VeriChip, the size of a grain of rice, is inserted under the skin with a needle in a procedure that takes less than 20 minutes to complete.

    Most popular
    • Most viewed • Top rated • Most e-mailed

    Ancient Peru pyramid spotted by satellite
    Man returns stolen plaque after 50 years
    Mortgage forgiven for 90-year-old who shot self
    A-plus! Makeover for math teacher
    Campaigns get personal; McCain called ‘erratic’
    Most viewed on msnbc.com
    Potato peelers put him on Park Avenue
    Fabled USS Intrepid returns to Manhattan
    Navy confirms lost WWII sub has been found
    CEO pay: These guys made how much?
    Ex-fiancé to missing tot’s mom: ‘Tell the truth’
    Most viewed on msnbc.com
    Ancient Peru pyramid spotted by satellite
    In ordeal as captive, character was shaped
    Mortgage forgiven for 90-year-old who shot self
    Unlocking the secrets of memory
    Frozen chicken linked to salmonella in 12 states
    Most viewed on msnbc.com

    updated 6:38 p.m. ET, Wed., Oct. 13, 2004
    WASHINGTON – Medical milestone or privacy invasion? A tiny computer chip approved Wednesday for implantation in a patient’s arm can speed vital information about a patient’s medical history to doctors and hospitals. But critics warn that it could open new ways to imperil the confidentiality of medical records.

    The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that Applied Digital Solutions of Delray Beach, Fla., could market the VeriChip, an implantable computer chip about the size of a grain of rice, for medical purposes.

    With the pinch of a syringe, the microchip is inserted under the skin in a procedure that takes less than 20 minutes and leaves no stitches. Silently and invisibly, the dormant chip stores a code that releases patient-specific information when a scanner passes over it.

    Story continues below ?
    ——————————————————————————–
    advertisement

    ——————————————————————————–

    Think UPC code. The identifier, emblazoned on a food item, brings up its name and price on the cashier’s screen.

    Chip’s dual uses raise alarm
    The VeriChip itself contains no medical records, just codes that can be scanned, and revealed, in a doctor’s office or hospital. With that code, the health providers can unlock that portion of a secure database that holds that person’s medical information, including allergies and prior treatment. The electronic database, not the chip, would be updated with each medical visit.

    The microchips have already been implanted in 1 million pets. But the chip’s possible dual use for tracking people’s movements — as well as speeding delivery of their medical information to emergency rooms — has raised alarm.

    “If privacy protections aren’t built in at the outset, there could be harmful consequences for patients,” said Emily Stewart, a policy analyst at the Health Privacy Project.

    To protect patient privacy, the devices should reveal only vital medical information, like blood type and allergic reactions, needed for health care workers to do their jobs, Stewart said.

    An information technology guru at Detroit Medical Center, however, sees the benefits of the devices and will lobby for his center’s inclusion in a VeriChip pilot program.

    “One of the big problems in health care has been the medical records situation. So much of it is still on paper,” said David Ellis, the center’s chief futurist and co-founder of the Michigan Electronic Medical Records Initiative.

    ‘Part of the future of medicine’
    As “medically mobile” patients visit specialists for care, their records fragment on computer systems that don’t talk to each other.

    “It’s part of the future of medicine to have these kinds of technologies that make life simpler for the patient,” Ellis said. Pushing for the strongest encryption algorithms to ensure hackers can’t nab medical data as information transfers from chip to reader to secure database, will help address privacy concerns, he said.

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Wednesday announced $ 139 million in grants to help make real President Bush’s push for electronic health records for most Americans within a decade.

    William A. Pierce, an HHS spokesman, could not say whether VeriChip and its accompanying secure database of medical records fit within that initiative.

    “Exactly what those technologies are is still to be sorted out,” Pierce said. “It all has to respect and comport with the privacy rules.”

    Applied Digital gave away scanners to a few hundred animal shelters and veterinary clinics when it first entered the pet market 15 years ago. Now, 50,000 such scanners have been sold.

    To kickstart the chip’s use among humans, Applied Digital will provide $ 650 scanners for free at 200 of the nation’s trauma centers.

    Implantation costs $ 150 to $ 200
    In pets

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Popups Powered By : XYZScripts.com
SEO Powered by Platinum SEO from Techblissonline