Jobs

Find job openings and jobs available now.

CNA,LPN,RN whats the difference , and how to become one of them.?

by tom44 on July 6, 2012

200 Companies Hiring Home Workers Now – Click Here
No Experience Necessary



Question by Nasir Z: CNA,LPN,RN whats the difference , and how to become one of them.?
Ok ,
I am currently working FT in IT but always wanted to be in some sort of Healthcare (coz the impact to others is more direct there).

Can someone please tell me the major differences between CNA,LPN,RN , and how can I become each of them .

I am not planning to leave my FT job , just wana work 20-25 hours a week ( as a nurse or any healthcare profession).

I thought we have the most opportunities (atleast in DC metro) as parttime being a nurse ..if you can think of any other please let me know.

Best answer:

Answer by Khrys
A CNA is a certified nursing assistant. They are the ones that do the most patient contact ex: CNA’s help with baths, change diapers, feed pts. Becoming a CNA is fairly easy. Alot of nursing homes and hospitals have on site training. The CNA certification is also available at most adult education sites.
As far as the Difference between a LPN and RN can be hard to explain. Go to the link below and see if it helps you.
Good luck in your decision. Another medical career to think about is EMS. Great fast paced and never the same two days in row.

Add your own answer in the comments!

IdentityCloaker.com
Take back your privacy!

Are you currently Unemployed?
Learn insider tips to landing a Federal Job

How to Land a Top-Paying Federal Job

Learn 4 Tips To Find Entry Level Jobs – Click Here

Share Button

2 thoughts on “CNA,LPN,RN whats the difference , and how to become one of them.?

  1. michr says:

    there are big differences betwen the three.
    keeping very basic and simple as not to offend any of the great work done by any of the three:
    CNA’s deal with ADL (activities of daily living)
    LPN’s deal with the hands on medical care
    RN’s deal more with supervision, and care plans and management of care.

    you could become a CNA or an LPN in your free-time.
    to get your LPN doing just part-time you could complete in 18 months to 2 years.

    to become an RN you are looking at 2 years minimum of full-time classes to get an associates degree ASN,RN and 3 1/2 to 4 years of fulltime in college to get your BSN,RN.

    U.S. Department of Labor
    Bureau of Labor Statistics
    Occupational Outlook Handbook
    http://www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm

    Occupational Outlook Handbook tells you:

    the training and education needed
    earnings
    expected job prospects
    what workers do on the job
    working conditions

    Certified Nursing Aides
    http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos165.htm

    Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses
    http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos102.htm

    Registered Nurses
    http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos083.htm

  2. MHnurseC says:

    CNA = certified nursing assistant. These folks do the bulk of the grunt work in patient care: baths, vital signs, cleaning of episodes of incontinence, transferring from bed to chair to bed again, daily weights and so on. This position generally includes a 40-60 hour training class followed by a certification exam.
    LPN = Licensed Practical Nurse. These folks have nursing training (15-18months) and licensure. The tasks that they perform are governed by state boards of nursing and further governed by the institutions in which they work. They can do nursing assessments and pass medications. In nursing homes, they can be charge nurses overseeing entire floors of patients and CNAs. 12-18 months of education and clinical experience followed by a licensure exam.
    RN = Registered nurse. These folks have 2-4 years of nursing education and are licensed by the state board of nursing. All of the responsibility for daily patient care falls onto these medical professionals. They deligate tasks to the CNAs and LPNs, provide direct patient care, pass medications, chart care activity, communicate with the physicians and run entire units. 3-4 years of nursing classes, clinical experiences and academic courses followed by a licensure exam.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Popups Powered By : XYZScripts.com
SEO Powered by Platinum SEO from Techblissonline